Haitian Civil Society 2013 Report on Forced Evictions in the Port-au-Prince Metropolitan Area

INTRODUCTION

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The Collective of Housing Rights Organizations presents an account of the forced evictions, murders, acts of arson, and various threats against the men, women, and children living under tents—along with those who defend them—suffered during the 2013 year.

Photo by Jackson Doliscar (FRAKKA)

Our objective in this document is to:

-Continue to inform national and international society on the horrible living conditions in the tent camps;

-Denounce all acts of violence and propaganda that seek to paint those living in camps as criminals;

Urgent Action: 20 Families in Camp KID Haiti Face Eviction (Amnesty)

“Twenty families at Camp KID displaced by the January 12th, 2010 Haiti earthquake face imminent threat of forced eviction” – Jackson Doliscar, FRAKKA.
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URGENT ACTION (First Posted by Amnesty International at http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/AMR36/007/2014/fr/3368640f-f5ad-45c6-b08d-527c6f41d4a2/amr360072014en.html)

Families at imminent risk of forced eviction
Around twenty families who were left homeless after the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti face imminent forced eviction from their makeshift camp in the capital, Port-au-Prince. If evicted they will once again be left homeless.
Approximately twenty families living in Camp KID displacement camp in the Christ-Roi area of Port-au-Prince are currently under the threat of forced eviction. It is known as Camp KID as it is located on land owned by the political organization Committee for Democratic Unity (Komite Inite Demokratik, KID).

CIVIL SOCIETY STATEMENT ON EVICTIONS IN CANAAN, HAITI

Image

Photo credit: Jackson Doliscar

The POSITION of the Haitian Collective for the Defense of the Right to Housing on the Systematic Eviction of Families in Canaan

The Haitian Collective for the Defense of the Right to Housing strongly denounces and stands firmly against all illegal forced evictions taking place against internally displaced people, many of whom have moved to Canaan as an alternative to IDP camps in the city.  Individuals claiming ownership over sections of Canaan have been assisted by the police and local court authorities in carrying out attacks, destroying the property and homes of hundreds of families without reprieve.  Those who have been evicted have lost everything they own and been subject to unnecessary violence including: physical assault, shots by police, and spraying of teargas.  These forced evictions have happened despite the fact that the land they occupied has been declared public utility land for victims of the January 12th 2010 earthquake.

Outsourcing Haiti: How Disaster Relief Became a Disaster of its Own

Cross-posted from Boston Review
January 16, 2014

Across the country from Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital, miles of decrepit pot-holed streets give way to a smooth roadway leading up to the gates of the Caracol Industrial Park, but no further. The fishing hamlet of Caracol, from which the park gets its name, lies around the bend down a bumpy dirt road. Four years after the earthquake that destroyed the country on January 12, 2010, the Caracol Industrial Park is the flagship reconstruction project of the international community in Haiti. Signs adorn nearby roads, mostly in English, declaring the region “Open for Business.” In a dusty field, hundreds of empty, brightly colored houses are under construction in neat rows. If all goes as hoped for by the enthusiastic backers of the industrial park, this area could be home to as many as 300,000 additional residents over the next decade.

The Collective of Organizations for the Defense of the Right to Housing condemns the threats and persecutions against the lawyer activist Patrice Florvilus

August 23, 2013

We, the members of the organizations of the haitian collective for the promotion of the right to housing and signatories of this note, raise the strongest protest against the maneuvers of intimidation, threats and persecution orchestrated against Mr. Patrice Florvilus, executive director of the Défenseurs des Opprimés (DOP) (Defenders of the Oppressed) which is an organization that is part of the collective. As a lawyer engaged in the defense of those displaced by the earthquake of January 12, 2010, Mr. Patrice  Florvilus has often accompanied victims of illegal and violent evictions, before the Haitian courts.

Attorney Patrice Florvilus Receives Summons to the Public Prosecutor’s Office of Port-au-Prince

Defenders of the Oppressed (DOP)
August 14, 2013

It is unbelievable but true: Patrice Florvilus, lawyer and director of the social movement legal support group ”Défenseurs des Opprimées/Opprimés (Defenders Oppressed) or DOP, has been summoned to appear in court on Monday, August 19, 2013 at 11:00 AM. Florvilus is accused of arson and conspiracy by Reynold Georges, lawyer of former dictator Jean Claude Duvalier.

We want to highlight that Mr. Florvilus represents oppressed people in Haiti, particularly social movements and those living in displacements camps since the 12 January 2010 earthquake.

State-sanctioned violence in Haiti’s displacement camps

The Force for Reflection and Action on Housing (FRAKKA)’s declaration on recent acts of government-sanctioned evictions and violence in displacement camps. Many of these cases have also been documented by local and international human rights groups. FRAKKA is a coalition of Haitian displacement camp committees and grassroots organizations.

August 8, 2013

We must stand up to the illegal actions of government-sanctioned thugs

We, the members of FRAKKA, have been making it known for months that people living in tent camps continue to be victims of sanctioned violence. These acts of violence include: murder, arrest, repression, forced eviction, arson, etc. Here are a series of examples:

1st Anniversary of the Park La Visite Massacre: The Position of the Collective of Housing Rights Organizations

July 23, 2013

To mark the one-year anniversary of the La Visite Massacre, the Collective of Housing Rights Organizations sends a message of solidarity to the families of the victims who are still waiting for justice from the State.

It has been one year since authorities from Jacmel and Marigot entered La Visite National Park and killed four peasants (Nicolas David, Enose Désir, Aléus Désir, and Volcin Robenson); they ransacked three houses and burned two others and shot two cattle. On this same destructive occasion, two children disappeared. They arrested and imprisoned Elius Alfred and Jean Louis Saint Fort without charging them for any crime. After many protests and demonstrations, the police released the two men.

Fear that slum will replace earthquake camps in Haiti

Reposted from BBC News
June 20, 2013

Three-and-a-half years after a devastating earthquake that killed 200,000 people, Haiti is slowly returning to normal.

There used to be 1.5 million people living under tents in the immediate aftermath of the quake – that number has now dropped to 320,000.

Much of the rubble has been cleared from the capital Port-au-Prince.

But there are fears that a gigantic new slum could spring up on the capital’s outskirts.

In the heart of Port-au-Prince, a choir poses for photographs in Place Boyer.

Haiti Grassroots Watch: Reconstruction’s Massive Slum Will Cost “Hundreds Of Millions”

Cross-posted from Haiti Grassroots Watch

Port-au-Prince, HAITI, June 17 2013 – Three years after its star-studded launch by President René Préval, actor Sean Penn and various other Haitian and foreign dignitaries, the model camp for Haiti’s 2010 earthquake victims has helped give birth to what might become the country’s most expansive – and most expensive – slum.

Known as “Canaan,” “Jerusalem” and “ONAville” – the new shantytown, spread across 1,100-hectares (11 square kilometers or 2,718 acres), is here to stay, Haitian officials told Haiti Grassroots Watch (HGW). Taxpayers and foreign donors will likely spend “many hundreds of millions” to urbanize the region, and as much as another US$64 million to pay off the landowners who are threatening to sue the government and the humanitarian agencies.